John Faught & Monica Schafer restore the iconic architect, Bruce Goff's Youngstrom House at Lake Quivira, KS. Originally built for Dr. Karl and Glenna Youngstrom in 1968, follow the renovation progress here.

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New Hardwood Floors

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When we purchased the house, the existing floors were an assortment of carpet, laminate, bamboo, concrete and natural, original stone. The natural stone, which resembles slate with the metallic properties of Mica or Pyrite, was still present in the entry way and around the fireplace. Thankfully, we were able to keep the awesome, original stone but everything else was too worn or out of date to salvage.

For the living floor, landings and master bedroom area, we chose a walnut engineered hardwood. When the installers came to preview the space, they warned that they might have issues which would prevent theem from being able to install the hardwood due to the intolerence level of the subfloors. Since most older lake front homes, including ours, have sloping and/or uneven floors, they anticipated such isses.

The day of the hardwood installation, they were only able to install three rows of the 5″ planks before the unlevel floors caused them to bow and flex so much they began to crack. At this point, they would not continue installing the flooring and gave us two options: 1) carpet everything or 2) level the floors.

After weighing the options, we decided to have them level the floors in the living, bedroom floors and entryway. They first appllied liquid cement to level the uneven areas and then applied 1/2 plywood on top of that. In some areas, the correction was as much as 3″.

Kitchen Cabinet Make-Over

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The oak cabinets were installed by the owner in the early 90′s. They were custom built well and still in excellent condition. In effort to stay within the budget and update their look, we decided a fresh coat of paint and new hardware was the way to make them work. We were warned against painting them ourselves but leaving them as is would’ve distracted from the overall look were going for and replacing them was not in the budget. So, we did our homework, talked to the professionals and followed the diections we were given.

We started with sanding everything with 100 grit sandpaper. After wiping off the dust we then went over all areas with Gloss Off, wiping it in on and then off immediately thereafter to remove dirt, dust, grease, and some polyeurethane. Using oil based Sherwin Williams primer, we rolled it on with four inch foam rollers. In retrospect, we should’ve added lacquer thinner to the primer. Without it, the primer was thick and sticky, making it difficult to cover evenly.

Using satin, oil based enamel in Sherwin Williams matched to Valpar color, Portland, we rolled the interior of the cabinets again with foam rollers. A commercial painter recommended adding lacquer thinner to the gallon of paint which made application much, much easier with an excellent end result. We applied three coats of paint the base cabinets.

Because of the design of the cabinet doors, we will spray the doors and drawers with a commercial paint sprayer using the same sand, prime and coat techniques used on the base cabinets. The result looks flawless and professional. Here’s hoping the paint job wears nicely!

Kitchen Floor Demo

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Eeek! TWO layers of tile to remove in the kitchen. Sadly, neither revealed what was the original floor. The top layer of black, polished stone was installed by the last owner in early 2000s atop a pinkish gray tile that was installed in the early 90′s during the homes last major renovation. The underlying tile was very difficult to remove as was installed using lathing and mortar technique that was nailed into the subfloor.

The birch-esque laminate floors in the living room, bedroooms and landings were easy to remove. The panels snapped together tongue and groove style without any glue or nails. This was a great and easy demo project that the kids even helped out with.

The laminate floor, tile and glass brick wall removed from the bedroom fit into the trailer in one load which we unloaded at the dump ourselves.

About the Architect

BRUCE GOFF ARCHITECT

Bruce Goff (1904-1982)Perhaps no Twentieth Century American architect was as fearless as Bruce Goff. His only parallel in the art world might be to outsider artists today. Frank Lloyd Wright even advised him to avoid studying at an architecture school
or risk losing what made him Bruce Goff in the first place. But though he remained classically unschooled, he
became so proficient in his art that he was appointed head of the Architecture Department at the University of
Oklahoma.

An obvious design prodigy as a child, he was apprenticed to a Tulsa architecture firm when he was twelve years
old. Early designs by him showed an artful comprehension of the Prairie idiom. Yet one of his only remaining
houses from 1920 would have seemed equally suitable in 1960.

Barely in his mid-twenties, Goff designed the most spectacular modernist church to this day, Tulsa’s Boston Avenue
Methodist-Episcopal Church on Boston Avenue. Now regarded as an Art Deco icon, it predates the Chrysler
Building in New York and the Emerald City on celluloid. But he would soon tire of this stylistic language in favor of a
more international modernism. Resembling Wright’s Usonian period, his houses from the mid thirties are spare and
simple, but his drawings of them were elegant graphic statements that went beyond practical design necessity. To
Bruce Goff, architecture was as much about drawing as it was about music, sculpture and dance. It also wasn’t
about learned formulas that were applicable to any job at hand. Architecture was about now .

In 1934 he moved to Chicago to work for Alfonso Iannelli. Some of his drawings show the influence of Russian
constructivism or Germany’s Bauhaus. He also began teaching at the Academy of Fine Arts. Teaching became as
much of an art form as designing for Goff. And throughout his career, his students would remember him as their
most inspiring mentor, so that the act of creation became paramount over the study of construction.

Goff went into the armed forces as a Seabee in World War II, allowing him to travel to California, Alaska and the
Aleutian Islands. Because building materials were scarce, he created barracks, chapels and mess halls using
simple military materiel. He seemed to find the purely utilitarian supplies liberating, fabricating quonset huts into
exercises in geometry beyond the usual bare bones of the structures.

After the war, his work evolved into total expressionism. His use of the materials at hand in the military inspired his
use of the native stone on a property for serpentine walls holding glass cullets for truly natural lighting. He rotated
quonset hut arches into spiral forms, and suspended floating rooms from steel cables.

No longer concerned with the conventional, Goff explored using any material for structural or decorative effect. Dime
store ashtrays embedded into walls allowed points of light to refract into rainbows in some of his interiors.
Cellophane strips replaced chandeliers and rows of white turkey feathers enabled ceilings to ripple in waves as the
homeowner walked through his house.

This hallucinogenic approach could sometimes lead to dreadful results, but like any great artist, Bruce Goff was
simply not afraid to be bad. His legacy is just now being understood as architectural expressionism has gained
newfound star appeal in the work of Frank Gehry, Rem Koolhaas and Peter Eisenmann.

The Art Institute of Chicago now holds the Goff archives and promotes him as an important Twentieth Century
forerunner of today’s New Modernism.


LINKS TO BRUCE GOFF PAGES AND IMAGES OF THIS GREAT ARCHITECT’S DESIGN WORK.

Friends of Kebyar:   Keepers of the faith and the cause of Organic Architecture:  http://www.Kebyar.com/

Some early bruce Goff design drawings:  http://www.architechgallery.com/arch_info/artists_pages/bruce_goff.html

Photo of Bruce Goff and several images of his architecture:       http://www.mscs.mu.edu/~mikes/ArtsWeb/goff/

Bruce Goff designed  Duncan house now a bed and breakfast:    http://brucegoff-castle-bandb.com/

THE BRUCE GOFF ARCHIVE  At the Art Institute of Chicago:   http://www.artic.edu/aic/libraries/goff/rbgoff.html In 1990, The Art Institute of Chicago received Goff’s comprehensive archive through the Shin’enKan Foundation, Inc. and Goff’s executor, Joe Price.

Bachman House http://www.ci.chi.il.us/Landmarks/B/BachmanHouse.html    Architect Bruce Goff created a neighborhood sensation in 1948, when he remodeled a modest wood house (built in 1889) into the home and studio for recording engineer Myron Bachman.

Turzak House http://www.ci.chi.il.us/Landmarks/T/TurzakHouse.html     Address: 7059 N. Olcott Ave. Year Built: 1938-39 Architect: Bruce Goff

Julius & Opal Cox Home (Boise City, OK) Bruce Goff, Architect designed in 1949     http://www.ptsi.net/user/museum/goff.html

Ruth Ford house, Aurora, IL, 1947-50 and Joe Price house, Bartlesville, OK, 1956,  Several photos of these two house designed by Bruce Goff: http://www.brynmawr.edu/Acads/Cities/imgb/197/197m.html

Bruce Goff designed the Education Building at Redeemer Lutheran Church 1961 Several photos  http://hometown.aol.com/redeembvl/bgoffedubldg.html

Bruce Goff’s Bavinger House, student term paper:  http://www.chuckiii.com/Reports/Architecture/Bruce_Goffs_Bavinger_House_.shtml


Los Angeles County Museum – Japanese Pavillion  http://www.washington.edu/ark2/archtm/USA414.html

LACMA Pavilion for Japanese Art Bruce Goff (completed by Bart Prince, after Goff’s death) 1988 

Several photos:    http://www.bluffton.edu/~sullivanm/goffla/goffla.html

Interior Images

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